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      • Examining Traditional Television and Online Video Use in the New Media Environment: Understanding the Role of Audience Activity, Media Orientation, Generational Cohort, and Contextual Age

Examining Traditional Television and Online Video Use in the New Media Environment: Understanding the Role of Audience Activity, Media Orientation, Generational Cohort, and Contextual Age

Author:
Bondad-Brown, Beverly A.
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara.Communication
Degree Supervisor:
RiceWeber RonaldRené E
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2011
Issued Date:
2011
Topics:
Communication
Keywords:
contextual age
YouTube
audience activity
online video
new media
media orientation
Description:

Viewers are increasingly accessing television and video content through the internet. Many networks now provide free access to television programs, while websites such as YouTube.com allow Internet users to post and view content via their computers. Some fear that television viewing will be replaced by online video use. However, little is known about viewers' motivations for accessing online video content, and the extent to which these are different from traditional television and internet motivations. Based on the uses and gratifications framework, motivations for viewing traditional television and online video content were explored. This study employed a survey among a national sample of US adults, and was informed by two pilot studies. Further, this study explored how online video recommendation sources relate to audience activity and media orientation. Due to the broad sample, generational theory was used to examine how one's generation may influence media use and whether traditional television and online video serve as functional alternatives. Finally, by considering the influence demographics, media use variables, and contextual age, models of television and online video use are explored.

Results suggest that the information, entertainment, and social interaction motivations were associated with greater television use, while the entertainment/pass time motivation and information motivation were associated with greater online video use. Respondents indicated that most online video content is discovered from others directly sharing clips or links to clips, however this recommendation source was not related to increased use. Surprisingly, online video use and discovering content using keyword searching were associated by the ritualized orientation rather than the instrumental orientation. Slight differences with traditional television and online video use motivations among generational cohorts were identified. Perhaps surprisingly, contextual age dimensions had no relationship with online video use. However, regression results indicate that those who are unhappy with life turn to television or online video to feel less lonely. Moreover, those who keep in touch with friends and family view television and online video use for motivations other than companionship.

Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/13030/m5t1549r
Merritt ARK:
ark:/13030/m5t1549r
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
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