Alexandria Digital Research Library

Defensores de la Patria: Mexico's Army and the Nineteenth-Century Creation of the Mexican Nation

Author:
Caton, Ricardo
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara.History
Degree Supervisor:
Soto Laveaga Gabriela
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2012
Issued Date:
2012
Topics:
Latin American history
Description:

This dissertation examines the early stages in the creation of the Mexican nation, particularly how its creators, both officials and "common people," looked at the Aztec past, colonial period, and independence insurgency (1810-1821) to piece together the nation and produce Mexican identity. I argue that due to the militarization of the country during the wars of independence, and the significant role given to the military by Mexico's constitutions of 1824 and 1836 as the protector of the patria and its independence, the Mexican army was vital in the nation's formation. By analyzing the military's structure and its role in the creation of Mexico, this study also sheds light on the composition of Mexican society in the early nineteenth century.

Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/13030/m5ng4r9r
Merritt ARK:
ark:/13030/m5ng4r9r
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
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